Final days of using “Moien” as accepted currency

Luxembourg residents are entering the final days of using “Moien” as accepted currency when boarding the bus.

For generations, Luxembourg citizens have used the word “Moien” to ‘pay’ for bus rides. Walking straight onto the bus confidently and giving the impression that you definitely have a valid bus pass in your pocket has long been a tradition in the Grand Duchy.

Now as the 1st March approaches when free transport across the country will become free, many residents are confused how this will effect driver / passenger relations.

Benelux News managed to speak with some bus users ahead of this historic ruling.

“Wait….. What…. You mean we had to pay before?” said one passenger.

While others were considering buying a 1st class ticket just to get away from ‘commoners’ using the free carriages on the train.

How this will effect the comfort of trains and buses in the future, only time will tell.

Satellite images emerge of Troisvierges

Scientists this week revealed images taken from satellites in space of Troisvierges in the north of Luxembourg.

The location, known mostly to the public as some place that a couple of trains go to and the occasional bus, is set to become the next area of exploration.

Space mining companies are keen to exploit the area for new findings in minerals.

More info to come as Benelux News follows progress.

Nobody really sure why train stations exist between Arlon and Namur

A recent survey revealed that regular train passengers who travel from Luxembourg to Brussels have absolutely no idea why train stations even exist between Arlon and Namur.

The frustratingly slow train which travels between 2 major European cities has come under fire for being totally boring and even going as far as ridiculing the silly hats worn by train ticket collectors. 

But the big mystery seems to be why Belgian authorities have decided to build train stations in the middle of nowhere. 

Jean-Pierre is a regular commuter on Belgian trains; “I just don’t get it. Nobody ever gets on and nobody ever gets off. It’s like Willy Wonkas chocolate factory.”

His statement was backed up by a fellow passenger. “I saw a scout group get on once at Gembloux. It was very strange. I guess they had been camping somewhere in the great outdoors.”

“Alarm” revealed as secret code word for Crémant

Thousands of commuters were left stunned this afternoon as a secret code was leaked to the public in the form of train code words.

It is an increasingly regular occurrence for Luxembourg trains to stop on the tracks with claims of an alarm being started either on the train or on another train somewhere down the line.

Now Benelux News can reveal that “Alarm” is coded language for Crémant and is used when the train drivers feel like having a drink.

“Alcohol use is very common among our public service workers,” claimed a spokesman. “We just love to annoy our passengers and celebrate doing so by having a drink behind the locked train door.”

“We prefer to stop in the middle of a track between stations,” said one of the drivers, who did not want to be named. “This way the passengers have no option of disembarking and finding alternative transport.”  

CFL refused to comment.